Data Falsification: Mazda Apologizes To Customers

…Says it has Completed Investigation

MATILDA FRANCES

Mazda Motor Corporation has apologized to its customers for any concern that falsification of data recently disclosed by Kobe Steel has caused its customers.

In a statement released on Tuesday, Mazda noted that it had completed an investigation into parts made from materials for which Kobe Steel has admitted falsifying data.

“As summarized below,” the statement read, “the investigation has confirmed that these parts have no impact on vehicles and meet Mazda’s standards for safety and durability.”

Materials affected by data falsification, Mazda’s investigation and the impact on Mazda vehicles:

Purchase method Material Impact on vehicles

(Date of Mazda’s announcement)

Results of Mazda’s Investigation and Testing
Purchased directly Aluminum plates No impact

(Oct. 20, 2017)

Materials for which data was falsified were used for some models in parts such as bonnets and trunk lids but testing has confirmed that there is no impact on these vehicles.
Steel powder Not applicable

(Nov. 10, 2017)

We have confirmed that Mazda vehicles do not use materials for which data was falsified.
Purchased via supplier Aluminum

plates

No impact

(Nov. 10, 2017)

Materials for which data was falsified were used for engine components and other parts in some models but testing has confirmed that there is no impact on these vehicles.
Steel powder
Aluminum extrusion Not applicable

(Nov. 10, 2017)

We have confirmed that Mazda vehicles do not use materials for which data was falsified.
Sputtering target materials
Copper tubes, steel wires, etc.
Copper products No impact

(Feb. 1, 2018)

Materials for which data was falsified were used in electronics for some models but testing has confirmed that there is no impact on these vehicles.
Aluminum alloy rods
  • These results are based on at least the past year of data held by Kobe Steel.

It added: “Mazda will make customer safety and peace of mind our first priority as we continue to make high-quality cars and aim to build a special bond with customers.”

It would be recalled that in October 2017, Kobe Steel, a Japanese company known to, over the years provide raw materials for big manufacturers of cars, aircraft and bullet trains, admitted falsifying data on many of its aluminium, copper and steel products it sold, setting off a scandal that has since reverberated through the global supply chain and casting a new shadow over the country’s reputation for precision manufacturing.

The company admitted to falsification over the past year relating to large quantities of four types of material; 19,300 tonnes of aluminium sheets and poles; 19,400 aluminium components; 2,200 tonnes of copper products and an unspecified amount of iron powder that was supplied to over 200 customers. These items were certified as having properties—such as a level of tensile strength, meaning stiffness—that they did not in fact possess

Following the shocking revelation, big multinationals, including automakers like Mazda, Toyota Motor, General Motors and Ford, as well as aircraft manufacturers like Boeing and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, instituted investigations, especially to determine if substandard materials were used in their products and, if so, whether they present safety hazards.

 

 

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