28 C
Lagos
Wednesday, July 8, 2020
Home Around-the-World LEVC Begins Fleet Trials of New Electric Van

LEVC Begins Fleet Trials of New Electric Van

London Electric Vehicle Company (LEVC) has officially started the real-world testing and trial phase for VN5, its new electric van and parcel delivery firm DPD is the first company to take delivery of a converted TX prototype.

Due to the similarities between TX and VN5, LEVC is deploying a fleet of converted TX-based prototypes utilising a full interior van conversion, kickstarting trials ahead of official VN5 launch later this year.​

Commenting, Joerg Hofmann, CEO, LEVC, expressed delight that DPD is the first company to begin testing of his company’s VN5 taxi-van prototypes.

He said: “These real-world tests mark a milestone occasion in the history of LEVC, as the company continues its transformation from an iconic British taxi brand to a leading electric vehicle manufacturer.

“VN5 is set to revolutionise green logistics and we are looking forward to working with DPD as it puts the vehicle through its paces. Feedback from major business operators will be crucial to the further development of the van as we rapidly move to its launch in Q4 this year.”

The VN5 cargo capacity easily accommodates two Euro sized pallets with a gross payload of over 800kg. It has been built with a large side-loading door (enabling a pallet to be side-loaded) and a 60/40 split door at the rear to make loading and unloading easy for the driver.

Based on the same architecture and proven eCity range-extender technology as LEVC’s TX electric taxi, VN5 offers the same electric powertrain with a pure EV range of 63 miles (102 km)* and with a total flexible range of 301 miles (485 km)*.Like the TX Taxi, VN5 is equipped with a class-leading turning circle of just 10.1m for unrivalled mobility in busy city environments.

The eCity technology meets the demanding duty cycles of various different sectors, and, for logistics businesses such as DPD, VN5 has been designed to provide ‘distribution to door’ – not just last mile – capability, creating a link between out of town depots and city centres. 

Dwain McDonald, DPD’s CEO , who described LEVC as an iconic British brand and another great Midlands-based business, expressed keenness  to see how the technology works forhis company.

“It is a very flexible solution,” he said, adding,  “it could well help solve a few challenges. It is very smart, and we like that. For example, we could use geo-fencing so that it switches automatically to electric-only on entering urban areas, including low emissions zones. We will certainly give it a good test and we’ll see how it works out.”​​

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisment -

Most Popular

Managing Mental Health Problems within Fleets

Fear, worry, and stress are normal responses to perceived or real threats. It is therefore reasonable to say that people are...

Report Review: Electric Vehicles in Agriculture

A new research report from IDTechEx has mirrored opportunities available for agricultural sector in the now wildly growing Electric vehicle technology.

Why Two Rugby Players Prefer Jeep Wrangler…“I was like a kid at Christmas waiting for its arrival,” says one of them

Two Wales rugby internationals well-versed in tough tackling on the pitch are now able to tackle the toughest terrain off it...

Hyundai Rolls out World’s First Fuel Cell Heavy-Duty Truck

Hyundai Motor Company on Tuesday shipped the first 10 units of the Hyundai XCIENT Fuel Cell, the world’s first mass-produced fuel...

Recent Comments

Chibuzo Ikelly on Contact Us
Warner Poorman on Contact Us
Daisy on Contact Us
DanielFar on Contact Us
RalphWaf on Contact Us
DarrylPab on Contact Us
Michael Stone on Contact Us
Kingsley-Bernard on Towing Tips from Land Rover
booters on
Dele Bamisile on Marshal Beware
error: Content is protected !!